Retrocausative Data Enveloping

It would be great to send memories into the past. Think of all you could accomplish if you knew back then what you know now. Obviously, in doing so, you would alter what you have done in your current timeline. This would inevitably adjust your future; an unavoidable paradox. That’s a classic view of how time works and one of the manners we wish we could manipulate it. Unfortunately, we’ve been mistaken about our concept of time. My goal is to enlighten others to what I’ve discovered.

Let us first understand that time is not a tangible thing. Time is the perceived measurement of our awareness. Time can’t be curved, halted, or manipulated in any fashion as it has no properties. However we can manipulate our perception or the intervals in which we measure. Examine the “Déjà vu” effect. Here is an effect to our perception that fools us into thinking it warps time; contrary to what physics explains is possible. But a Déjà vu isn’t manipulating anything; it’s a cognitive process of receiving data. Countless times I’ve predicted the outcome of events based on a strong memory of that situation. I’ve predicted speech, numbers, odors, motion and an assortment of other occurrences. It has been stated that it’s just the subconscious performing pattern recognition, but I’ve since eliminated that possibility from my experiments. I’ve experimented and learned that strong precognitive memories bled into my past through what can only be referred to as Retrocausative Data Enveloping (RDE). In the past, I have set dates to perform experiments in the future that dealt with making, sending, receiving, and modifying memory. These dates have now come to pass, and thus my perceived precognitive abilities have grown significantly.

A hypothesis as reflected by my data:
Everything we perceive has already happened but we can only process the information so quickly. Consider a computer processor that is instructed to process (perceive) data off of a hard disk consecutively. The data already exists but the processor hasn’t become aware of it yet. Peoples’ minds are like processors that read data from a hard disk in read-only mode. Now consider instructing the processor to read data a little further in distance from your current operating progress. This is what I’m instructing my brain to do; it’s not manipulating time, it’s just altering the data source. We perceive this source as the future, even though it isn’t from the concept of time but rather location. Acting upon the information received from a RDE event allows you write access to the data source. Remember, time is only the perceived measurement of our awareness. The classic explanation of time does not exist.

I’ve been experimenting with increasing the duration, and distance between, Déjà vu incidents and the occurrence of their data envelope. I have been successful in memory recall of up to fourteen seconds ahead but the sensation from the Déjà vu effects are disorienting. It’s difficult to perform these experiments consecutively without rest. Because of this limitation to consecutive occurrences, I believe this is a mental utility for use when you absolutely must ensure a successful outcome. For instance, you could use RDE to see an occurrence in a life threatening situation. I will continue to practice in the hopes that it becomes easier to perform. Paradoxically, using enveloped information to modify the outcome forsakes the accuracy of the original data envelope. This is what usually happens and is therefore not classified as precognition. The original memory isn’t remembered, you just remember the change to the existing memory. As long as you survive the event, it shouldn’t matter.

-Jeremy Edward Dion

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